Thursday, May 28

SCOTCH HOUSE FILM TO DEBUT ON MISSISSIPPI PUBLIC BROADCASTING

Tonight at 9 p.m. Above the Line: Saving Willie Mae's Scotch House will debut on Mississippi Public Television. The film, produced by SFA filmmaker Joe York and his colleagues at the Center for Documentary Projects, chronicles the efforts of SFA and one amazing John Currence to rebuild a restaurant in post-Katrina New Orleans. If you're not living in Mississippi, you can still see the film online here.

Wednesday, May 20

GOOD FOOD FILM FESTIVAL: NASHVILLE, TN

On Tuesday nights in June and July, Nashville's Warner Park Nature Center will host the Good Food Film Festival. Two SFA films, Saving Seeds and The Rise of Southern Cheese, are on the program for July 7. For more information on the festival, including a full schedule of events and details, visit http://www.richlandgardens.net/filmfestival.html.

Here's a quick view of the lineup:
  • June 16: Tableland
  • June 23: King Corn
  • June 30: A Sense of Wonder
  • July 7: Saving Seeds & The Rise of Southern Cheese, by the SFA
  • July 14: The Real Dirt on Farmer John
  • July 23: Good Food Shorts, by Media that Matters

Monday, May 18

A SOUL REVIVING FEAST

Southern Studies students studied food and culture in the 2009 spring documentary studies class, led by Dr. David Wharton, of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, and Dr. Andy Harper, of UM's Center for Documentary Projects. Students submitted films as a final projects. Tortillas de Maiz, the film by Alan Pike, Ferriday Mansel, and Duvall Osteen (shared on the blog April 25) received an SFA Greenhouse award of $250. SFA is pleased to showcase another student film here: A Soul Reviving Feast, by Sarah Simonson, Melanie Young, and Miles Lasseter. For a view of the other class projects, visit the Center for Documentary Projects blog here.

Thursday, May 14

AFRICAN ETHNOBOTANY IN THE AMERICAS


On June 2nd, the College of Charleston is hosting the Society of Economic Botany’s 50th Anniversary Conference. The theme is “African Ethnobotany in the Americas”

Up-rooted from ancestral lands, Africans arrived with their minds and cultural heritages intact despite the horrors of the “Middle Passage.” Enduring adversity, enslaved Africans put down roots in the soils of the Americas and grew new crops (as well as old) with resourcefulness and creativity.

A focus on foodways is particularly appropriate since Charleston and South Carolina Lowcountry represented one of the major entry ports for people of African descent.

With African Atlantic foodways as the focal point, presentations, performances and the artists’ exhibit and panels will highlight complex, multiethnic, and diverse Southern culinary histories.

Featured speakers include Jessica Harris, Michael Twitty, and John Mason (pictured.) For more info.

JOIN THE SFA IN THE MOUNTAIN EMPIRE

Rita Forrester (L) sings with Tennessee Skyline at the Fold. Photo by Amy C Evans. See more pictures from the Carter Family Fold here.

"The thing my mother, Janette Carter, was doing here at the Carter Family Fold with the music was a big part of everything, but food was an essential part of making that experience warm and welcoming."
~Rita Forrester, granddaughter of A. P. and Sara Carter

We'll celebrate the memory of the first family of country music, the legendary Carter Family, whose Bristol recordings in 1927 marked the birth of the country music industry. Saturday night at the Carter Family Fold means great music. Get ready to tap your toes and shake your hips to the next generation of Bluegrass music, The Larkins. Of course, we'll eat a bite (or two). Look forward to a supper of soup beans, chicken salad, and homemade cakes prepared by the descendants of A.P., Sara, and Maybelle Carter. Register now.